One year on from the introduction of a new computing curriculum in schools across England, the coding element still garners the most interest. To celebrate European Code Week, we take a look at some of the latest happenings in the coding space. 

BBC to launch pocket-sized computer

The BBC plans to give away up to one million micro:bits – a pocket-sized codeable computer – to 11 and 12-year-olds across the UK in 2016. Building on the legacy of the 1980s BBC Micro computer, the micro:bit aims to “inspire digital creativity and help to develop a new generation of tech pioneers”. There’s lots of information about the micro:bit and the corporation’s Make It Digital initiative on the BBC website.

Vodafone and The Diana Award encourage kids to Be Strong Online

Vodafone has teamed up with leading UK charity The Diana Award’s Anti-Bullying Campaign to develop a new programme for schools called Be Strong Online. The second module in the programme helps to get young people excited about coding and will be available for download in late October 2015. Find out more about Be Strong Online.

Why aren’t girls embracing STEM subjects?

Recent research by Accenture revealed that half of 12-year-old girls perceive STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) as more suited to boys and that parents and teachers have the biggest influence on girls’ subject choices at school. Want to encourage your daughter’s interest in technology and other STEM subjects? Check out STEMettes and TechFuture Girls first.

There’s more to computing than coding

Don’t forget, coding is just one part of the computing curriculum. As Mark Chambers of Naace comments: “It takes the development of a variety of digital skills and knowledge if we want students to use technology, understand how it works, solve problems effectively and communicate those solutions to clients.” Find out more about the computing curriculum in England on the Department for Education website and in The Guardian.