Mobile Centres of Excellence: the strategic ingredient to business transformation

Jump to next section
Search Results

Mobile technology has become central to our everyday lives and critical to business productivity, growth and customer engagement. But with so many stakeholders now chomping at the bit to unlock the value of mobile it runs the risk of being approached in a disparate way.

So what exactly is a Mobile Centre of Excellence and why do you need one?

Picture the modern enterprise. At one end of the business the CMO is building a new customer-facing app. At the other end the head of HR is trialling mobile-based time-billing software. And somewhere in the middle the CIO is trying to maintain visibility and control over no end of mobile purchasing decisions. Quite possibly while handling the complexities that come with BYOD and BYOx policies; and while trying to ensure that all the mobile technologies entering the business are as secure, efficient and strategic as possible.

Mobile technology has become central to our everyday lives and critical to business productivity, growth and customer engagement. But with so many stakeholders now chomping at the bit to unlock the value of mobile it runs the risk of being approached in a disparate way.

Enterprises can avoid fragmentation by establishing a Mobile Centre of Excellence (Mobile CoE) – a group of people within the business appointed to centralise and coordinate mobile efforts. A Mobile CoE will help the business develop and enforce a strong IT architecture and user experience, while ensuring security policies and standards are continually updated in line with evolving technologies. With a Mobile CoE in place, the business benefits from mobile leadership, training and best practices, putting it in the best possible place to drive business transformation.

Coordinating differing needs

According to Simon Buck, Head of Mobility Solutions at Vodafone Global Enterprise, businesses often start using mobile technologies because they think they need to. “The steps are not necessarily planned,” said Buck, “but as more and more mobile technologies enter the business it becomes difficult to manage the assets and to understand how they are being used. And without this understanding, it becomes harder to define a strategy for reclaiming control.”

Once businesses are further down their mobile journey they are more likely to think about the strategic value that mobility can bring. Instead of viewing it as a technology, expense or security risk, they start to view mobility as an enabler of business transformation. “Mobile CoE is a way of coordinating different stakeholders, bringing together best practice and devising strategies for effectively implementing business change,” said Buck. “Mobile CoE should mean different things to different people because it is dependent on the priorities of their specific business.”

Simplifying the complex

Global multinational corporations (MNCs) can work with Managed Mobility services providers to build best practice Mobile CoEs – and to outsource skills and services that they would otherwise have to invest in themselves.

“We manage some of the largest Managed Mobility deployments globally,” said David Joosten, Sales Manager at Vodafone Global Enterprise, “from networks, to devices, to all related services. Owning the networks used for roaming and putting a service wrap around these gives us a unique capability.”

And by choosing a total communications services provider that offers fixed, wired, wireless and cloud technologies MNCs can also take a total communications approach of consolidating communications into one global supplier and one global contract.

“We have first-hand experience of evolving from a fragmented business – through global growth and acquisitions – into a consolidated estate,” continued Joosten, “and this enables us to not only meet the total communications needs of our customers, but guide them with the knowledge of a business that has been there and done it.”

Driving transformation

When communications have been consolidated – and a Mobile CoE has been established to coordinate a centralised mobile strategy – a business is in a great place to embrace transformative technologies such as Unified Communications and fixed-mobile convergence.

“If our customers are seeing their users move away from fixed phones we can help them converge their current fixed devices into a single-number, per employee, for each of their fixed and mobile devices,” said Roy van de Kamp, Head of Benelux at Vodafone Global Enterprise, “and we can do that while continuing to manage the network and the device and the service – all while providing mobile expertise and knowledge to support end-users.

“Ask anyone these days what they prefer, mobile phone or computer,” continued van de Kamp, “the answer will undoubtedly be the mobile phone. Apps give better user experiences that are less cluttered and specific to requirements. This is driving the behaviour we are seeing right now.”

In order to get it right at organisational level and reap the benefits of Mobile Centres of Excellence, support at the appropriate level is essential.

“We are talking about organisational climate and change rather than specific products,” continued van de Kamp, “and we are talking about the best practices for driving change.”

Companies who fail to recognise this are losing out. “If you are not there as a business,” concluded Buck, “you are not driving productivity.”

Find out more

Reduce the complexities of managing your mobile infrastructure